ARTICLES

A few snippets of news extracted from a variety of world-wide publications featuring coverage of South Africa’s surgical attractions:

PATIENT TRAVELERS

EXTRACTS FROM: HEALTH BY STEPHANIE COOPERMAN COURTESY OF FORBES

Josef Woodman, author of Patients Beyond Borders: Everybody's Guide to Affordable, World-Class Medical Tourism, estimates that more than 150,000 Americans went abroad for medical care in 2006. Many are uninsured, self-employed or looking to defer the average $10,000 to $12,000 in insurance premiums a family of four now pays a year. Some need joint replacements or stem cell therapies not yet approved by the FDA.Others want to return from an overseas vacation with larger breasts and flatter stomachs. All are searching for quality health care at discount prices, sometimes finding savings of up to 90 percent. Foreign hospitals are more than willing to cut through the red tape and offer Americans fast, efficient services in state-of-the-art facilities complete with luxury suites, on-call concierges and personal chauffeurs. Time to sightsee? Just icing on the cake.

HOW TO CONCEIVE IN STYLE

BY JANI MEYER - SUNDAY TRIBUNE

“Fertility safaris” are taking off in South Africa with the number of foreign women and couples seeking treatment doubling in the past year.

Fertility treatment in South Africa was pushed into the spotlight after a 60-year-old New Jersey woman gave birth to twins after receiving treatment at a Cape Town in-vitro fertilisation clinic.

Frieda Birnbaum gave birth to twins Josh and Jaret in May this year - becoming the oldest mother of twins in the US.

OPERATION FOR 'BOOB MAN'

LIPOSUCTION TO REDUCE BREASTS - BY ALFRED MOSELAKGOMO - SOWETAN

Sabelo Maepa*, the Mpumalanga man who has developed boobs, is to undergo plastic surgery at the Johannesburg Hospital.

Hundreds of men undergo male breast reduction surgery every year, according to Ingrid Lomas, chief executive of Surgical Attractions.

MR VANITY FAIR

COURTESY OF PEOPLE MAGAZINE

Star's photo1. CALF IMPLANTS

Calf implants are done under general anaesthetic with an overnight hospital stay and a recuperation period of between 10 and 14 days. The procedure, which takes just an hour to perform, is ideal for men who have matchstick or knock-knee legs. Calf implants will be inserted, via a tiny incision behind the knee, into a convenient ‘Medical Compartment’, located directly above the appropriate muscle in the calf. You will be discharged from hospital the following morning. Due to the insertion of the prosthesis, your calves will feel very tight initially and a certain amount of discomfort and difficulty might be experienced while walking during the first week following surgery. If you feel the need to wear shoes during the recuperative period, it is suggested that shoes with only slight heels be worn, in order to ease the discomfort.
Cost: Between R 21 000 and R 70 000.

THE TRUTH ABOUT COSMETIC SURGERY

COURTESY OF PEOPLE MAGAZINE

If you are considering cosmetic surgery, make sure you do research to achieve the best results. For more information contact Surgical Attractions via their website www.surgicalattractions.com, by e-mail at info@surgicalattractions.co.za, or telephonically on (011) 880 – 5122.

Having plastic surgery is not something you should jump at without giving it some serious thought.

CUTTING-EDGE TECHNOLOGY WITHOUT THE KNIFE-BEAUTY TREND

COURTESY OF PEOPLE MAGAZINE

No-knife surgery has fast become the hottest trend in Hollywood with celebrities literally turning back the clock 10 years in just under an hour.

Stars'photo1They say time marches on and Hollywood stars have found that the infamous march usually takes place across one’s face, resulting in fine lines and wrinkles that can spell career doom in an industry that thrives on looking gorgeous!

While five years ago these stars would have headed to the operating table and gone under the knife quicker than you can say ‘flawless forehead’, millions are now indulging in ‘no-knife’ surgery.

According to the American Society For Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, a whopping 7,5 million ‘minimally-invasive’ procedures were performed in the States last year alone. These quick dips into the fountain of the youth can be squeezed into a lunch hour and reserve the effects of years of ageing without the scary scalpels, long recovery periods and hefty price tags. The only downfall is that results are often not permanent and patients need to repeat the process between 12 weeks to eighteen months afterwards. So who in Hollywood has given Mother Nature a helping hand in their quest to look their best? Well, the real question should be who in Hollywood hasn’t?

I WENT TO SOUTH AFRICA TO SAVE ON COST

Now magazine's logo
NOW MAGAZINE

Joanna's photo1Student and part-time dancer Joanna Scaife travelled to Johannesburg for her breast augmentation in April this year.

"I've been dreaming of breast surgery since I was 14. All the busty girls attracted the boys but with an A-cup I just looked flat and childlike. Every night I prayed that my boobs would grow, but I reached 34B at 16 and that was it.

I hated my figure so much that it was simpler to be a tomboy.

But by my 18th birthday I'd had enough of not being girly and glam, so I started hitting the gym, having my hair done regularly and keeping my fake tan topped up. My confidence shot up when I met my IT consultant boyfriend John, but deep down I still really wanted surgery.

SUN, SEA, SAND ... AND SURGERY

THE GUARDIAN

(This article has been edited for length. The original article can be found here.)

Faced with a choice between NHS waiting lists and expensive private clinics, says Joanna Moorhead, more and more Britons are opting to go abroad for treatment - with a holiday thrown in.

SURGERY SAFARIS POSE NO SPECIAL RISK, SAY SA'S PLASTIC SURGEONS

BY CARLI LOURENS, TRADE AND INDUSTRY EDITOR

SA is not the cheap and nasty destination for plastic surgery as portrayed in UK newspaper The Daily Mail last week, says the local plastic surgeons’ association.

South African surgeons are more experienced than their British counterparts and are trained on the British system, said Dr Tom Ford, president of the Association of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons of Southern Africa. The article could damage a thriving industry in SA, as it challenged SA’s global reputation as a "good and a safe" destination, said Ford.

SURGICAL ATTRACTIONS OF SOUTH AFRICA

EXPLORE SOUTH AFRICA MAGAZINE

When John Keats wrote "A thing of beauty is a joy forever" Medical Tourism was unheard of. He would therefore have had no way of knowing that his now famous words would one day so aptly describe the endless beauty of South Africa: a country now synonymous with Medical Tourism, made popular by Cosmetic Surgery, and through which a little of South Africa's beauty manages to rub off on a large percentage of its medical tourists annually.